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Vintage Guatemalan Huipil // Handwoven Hand Dyed // A Work of Art

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Vintage Guatemalan Huipil // Handwoven Hand Dyed // A Work of Art

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Vintage Guatemalan Huipil // Handwoven Hand Dyed // A Work of Art

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Bright & Beautiful Vintage Handcrafted Guatemalan Huipil

*Lots of Beautiful + Meaningful Woven Details
*Handwoven + Hand Dyed Quality Vintage Cotton
*Simple Caftan Shape
*Stunning Colors & Motif
*Amazing Vintage Artisan Piece!

Huipiles are truly special pieces.  All of our huipils are vintage/second hand.  You can read more about the meaning and origin of these works of art below.

SIZE: Free Size S/M/L-- (please check measurements provided below)

*Armhole Circumference: 11 1/2 inches
*Bust: Open/65 inches
*Waist: Open/67 inches
*Hips: Open/66 inches
*Length: 30 1/2 inches

Color: Bright & Beautiful Rainbow Multi

Material: Cotton

Condition: Excellent Vintage Condition!

Huipil (pronounced wee-peel) is the Spanish word for the traditional blouses worn by Mayan women for many centuries. They are still prominent in Guatemalan and a few other Latin American cultures today. The huipil is the most prevalent part of a woman’s traditional dress. The weave or design of each huipil can identify her individual personality and the village she is from, as well as her marital, social, wealth, and religious status. The patterns and meanings on the huipil have remained the same over the years since the ancient Maya civilization. When a huipil is finished it is a work of art and can sometimes take months to complete.

Artisans in Guatemala make and sell huipils to help to support their families and improve their living conditions, but they are also an important part of culture and are worn widely among the natives of Guatemala.  Guatemalan women have hand-woven their clothing on a back strap loom for centuries and pass along the tradition through the years. They start with raw wool or cotton that they wash, comb and spin. Then they stretch the threads along a warping board and attach it to the loom. The designs are created by weaving colored yarns into the cloth as it is being woven. The process is called brocade. The weaver sometimes will use natural dyes, such as flowers, plants, insects, bark, or berries. -- Information from www.guatemalanhuipils.com

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